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The effects of mobile social networking service-based cognitive behavior therapy on insomnia in nurses

Title
The effects of mobile social networking service-based cognitive behavior therapy on insomnia in nurses
Authors
Kim J.E.Kim S.-S.
Ewha Authors
김석선
SCOPUS Author ID
김석선scopus
Issue Date
2017
Journal Title
Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing
ISSN
2005-3673JCR Link
Citation
Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing vol. 47, no. 4, pp. 476 - 487
Keywords
Cognitive therapyNursesQuality of lifeSleep
Publisher
Korean Society of Nursing Science
Indexed
SCIE; SSCI; SCOPUS; KCI WOS scopus
Document Type
Article
Abstract
Purpose: This study aimed to examine the effects of cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) based on the mobile social networking service (SNS) on dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep, sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, depression, and quality of life among rotatingshift nurses in a hospital in Korea. Methods: A nonequivalent control group pre-post test design was used. The participants included 55 nurses with rotating three-shift work (25 in the experimental group and 30 in the control group). For the experimental group, CBT-I using mobile SNS was provided once a week for 60 minutes over six weeks. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, x2-test, independent samples t-test, and Mann-whitney U test with the SPSS 21.0 program. Results: In the homogeneity test of the general characteristics and study variables, there were no significant differences between the two groups. Nurses in the experimental group had significantly lower scores on dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes regarding sleep and sleepiness than nurses in the control group. Nurses in the experimental group had significantly higher scores on sleep quality and quality of life than nurses in the control group. Conclusion: These findings indicate that using the mobile SNS-based CBT-I is feasible and has significant and positive treatment-related effects on rotating-shift nurses’ irrational thoughts and beliefs in association with sleep, sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and quality of life. These contribute to expanding our knowledge of rotating-shift nurses’ sleep issues and their preferences for intervention. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science.
DOI
10.4040/jkan.2017.47.4.476
Appears in Collections:
간호대학 > 간호학전공 > Journal papers
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