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Luteolin as a potential preventive and therapeutic candidate for Alzheimer's disease

Title
Luteolin as a potential preventive and therapeutic candidate for Alzheimer's disease
Authors
Kwon Y.
Ewha Authors
권영주
SCOPUS Author ID
권영주scopus
Issue Date
2017
Journal Title
Experimental Gerontology
ISSN
0531-5565JCR Link
Citation
vol. 95, pp. 39 - 43
Keywords
Alzheimer's diseaseAnti-inflammatory agentsInflammationLuteolin
Publisher
Elsevier Inc.
Indexed
SCI; SCIE; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Abstract
Amyloid cascade hypothesis is the main theoretical framework describing the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, most clinical trials of therapy targeting amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) are unsuccessful because AD is a complex disease involving many genetic and environmental factors. Among various factors, inflammation within the brain in particular has been implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of AD. Furthermore, it has been shown that systemic inflammation can initiate AD. Therefore, anti-inflammatory agents might be beneficial for prevention and/or treatment of AD. Many reports have indicated that luteolin, a flavone found in various foods, has preventive and therapeutic value for neurodegenerative diseases including AD. Such effect of luteolin has been linked to its ability to relieve neuroinflammation. Luteolin also has other biological functions, including antioxidant activity that may provide added benefit for prevention of AD. The exact mechanisms of inflammatory pathways involved in AD pathogenesis need to be further understood to utilize luteolin and many other available anti-inflammatory agents to prevent and treat AD. In addition, it is critical to develop better experimental models that resemble the inflammatory conditions in clinical AD. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.
DOI
10.1016/j.exger.2017.05.014
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엘텍공과대학 > 식품공학전공 > Journal papers
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