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The complex nature of bilinguals' language usage modulates task-switching outcomes

Title
The complex nature of bilinguals' language usage modulates task-switching outcomes
Authors
Yang H.Hartanto A.Yang S.
Ewha Authors
양수진
SCOPUS Author ID
양수진scopus
Issue Date
2016
Journal Title
Frontiers in Psychology
ISSN
1664-1078JCR Link
Citation
vol. 7, no. APR
Keywords
BilingualismMixing costsShifting EFSwitch costsTask switchingThe adaptive control hypothesis
Publisher
Frontiers Research Foundation
Indexed
SSCI; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Abstract
In view of inconsistent findings regarding bilingual advantages in executive functions (EF), we reviewed the literature to determine whether bilinguals' different language usage causes measureable changes in the shifting aspects of EF. By drawing on the theoretical framework of the adaptive control hypothesis-which postulates a critical link between bilinguals' varying demands on language control and adaptive cognitive control (Green and Abutalebi, 2013), we examined three factors that characterize bilinguals' language-switching experience: (a) the interactional context of conversational exchanges, (b) frequency of language switching, and (c) typology of code-switching. We also examined whether methodological variations in previous task-switching studies modulate task-specific demands on control processing and lead to inconsistencies in the literature. Our review demonstrates that not only methodological rigor but also a more finely grained, theory-based approach will be required to understand the cognitive consequences of bilinguals' varied linguistic practices in shifting EF. © 2016 Yang, Hartanto and Yang.
DOI
10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00560
Appears in Collections:
사회과학대학 > 심리학전공 > Journal papers
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