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The Relationship between Social Skills, Executive Functions, and Story Comprehension in Children with and without Specific Language Impairment

Title
The Relationship between Social Skills, Executive Functions, and Story Comprehension in Children with and without Specific Language Impairment
Authors
Mun J.Yim D.
Ewha Authors
임동선
SCOPUS Author ID
임동선scopus
Issue Date
2021
Journal Title
Communication Sciences and Disorders
ISSN
2288-1328JCR Link
Citation
Communication Sciences and Disorders vol. 26, no. 1, pp. :34 - 53
Keywords
Executive functionSocial skillsSpecific language impairmentStory comprehension
Publisher
Korean Academy of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
Indexed
SCOPUS scopus
Document Type
Article
Abstract
Objectives: This study aimed to compare and examine the correlation between the social skills (problem solving, emotional expression, sense of order, and confidence), executive function (updating, inhibition, and shifting), and story comprehension ability of children with and without Specific Language Impairment (SLI). Also, this study investigated if social skills and executive function predict the performance in the story comprehension task in each group. Methods: A total of 33 children (14 children with SLI and 19 TD children) aged 4 to 7 years participated in this study. Parents assessed their children’s social skills using the Korean-Social Skill Rating Scale for Preschoolers (K-SSRSP). Children performed the tasks of executive function and story comprehension. Results: Children with SLI received significantly lower scores than TD children on the K-SSRSP. Also, children with SLI performed significantly lower than TD children in inhibition, shifting and story comprehension tasks. In TD children, there was a positive correlation between story comprehension ability and updating ability. In children with SLI, story comprehension ability was positively correlated with problem solving and emotional expression. Moreover, in TD children, updating ability significantly predicted their story comprehension ability. On the other hand, in children with SLI, the factors predicting their story comprehension ability were found to be problem solving and emotional expression among social skills. Conclusion: These results present the necessity to look into the social skills when evaluating and intervening with children with SLI or when advising non-experts such as parents or caregivers © 2021 Korean Academy of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
DOI
10.12963/csd.20758
Appears in Collections:
사범대학 > 언어병리학과 > Journal papers
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