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An investigation into structural behaviors of skulls chewing food in different occlusal relationships using FEM

Title
An investigation into structural behaviors of skulls chewing food in different occlusal relationships using FEM
Authors
Lee Y.-K.Chun Y.-S.
Ewha Authors
전윤식김희선
SCOPUS Author ID
전윤식scopus; 김희선scopus
Issue Date
2020
Journal Title
Clinical and Experimental Dental Research
ISSN
2057-4347JCR Link
Citation
Clinical and Experimental Dental Research vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 277 - 285
Keywords
chewing simulationFEA (finite element analysis)occlusal relationshipskullstructural behavior
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
Indexed
SCOPUS scopus
Document Type
Article
Abstract
Objectives: This study aims to investigate the effect of different occlusal relationships on skull structural and mechanical behaviors through simulation of chewing food. Methods: Finite element (FE) skull models of occlusion for Class I, end-on Class II, and full-cusp Class II were generated. End-on Class II and full-cusp Class II were chosen as mild and severe Class II occlusions, respectively. A simplified food bolus was introduced between the upper and lower dentition of the right molars. Chewing food was simulated in the skulls by moving the mandible. An experiment was conducted to measure strains at selective locations and compared them to the analytical results for validation. Results: In the early stages of mandibular movement, masticatory forces predicted from the skull models without food were lower than the skull models with food but increased drastically after occluding teeth full enough. As a result, the relationship between masticatory force and mandible movement shows that there is no significant difference between the skull models with food and without food in the range of human masticatory force, approximately 250 N. In all the cases of skulls including a food bolus, stress was similarly propagated from the mandible to the maxilla and concentrated in the same regions, including the mandibular notch and alveolar bone around the lower molars. Conclusion: It is predicted that there is no significant difference of bite force–mandible movement relationships and stress distributions of skull and teeth, between end-on Class II and full-cusp Class II models. When simulating chewing activities on candy and carrot, it is also found that there is no difference of masticatory performance between Class II occlusions, from structural as well as mechanical perspectives. © 2020 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Dental Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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DOI
10.1002/cre2.273
Appears in Collections:
의과대학 > 의학과 > Journal papers
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