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dc.contributor.author김정아-
dc.contributor.author박진-
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-04T16:30:17Z-
dc.date.available2020-05-04T16:30:17Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.issn1011-8934-
dc.identifier.issn1598-6357-
dc.identifier.otherOAK-26843-
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.ewha.ac.kr/handle/2015.oak/253895-
dc.description.abstractBackground: In 1999, the Organ Transplantation Act legalized organ donation from brain-dead patients. As a result of the government's continued efforts, the number of brain-dead donors steadily increased from 2002 through 2016. However, the number has declined since 2017. This paper examined the possible reasons behind the decline in brain-dead organ donation. Methods: This investigation was an analysis of published data from the Korea Organ Donation Agency annual reports from 2013 to 2018. Results: The number of brain-dead organ donors in Korea rose steadily until 2016, declined in 2017 for the first time since 2002, and then dropped sharply in 2018. Although the number of brain-dead potential organ donors increased between 2017 and 2018, the number of eligible donors decreased, suggesting that patient families rejected the brain-death determination process and brain-dead organ donation. Statistics gathered during identification of brain-dead potential donors and actual donations confirm that rejection or withdrawal of consent by the family has increased. During the same period when donation from brain- dead patients decreased, five events occurred: 1) compensation for donor families was abolished; 2) an incident of mistreatment of a brain-dead donor's remains occurred; 3) the Life-Sustaining Treatment Act was enacted, providing a legal procedure whereby families of brain-dead patients could forgo life-sustaining treatment; 4) residents' work week was limited to 80 hours; and 5) the Labor Standards Law was amended. Conclusion: Fewer eligible donors in spite ofan increase in brain-dead potential organ donors suggests that reduction in these donations resulted mainly from factors associated with family consent. Among such factors, implementation of the Life-sustaining Treatment Act appears to be most important. Abolition of family compensation and the incident in which a brain-dead donor's remains were mistreated may also have influenced family consent.-
dc.languageEnglish-
dc.publisherKOREAN ACAD MEDICAL SCIENCES-
dc.subjectBrain Death-
dc.subjectEthics-
dc.subjectFamily-
dc.subjectOrgan Donor-
dc.subjectOrgan Transplantation-
dc.titleRecent Decrease in Organ Donation from Brain-Dead Potential Organ Donors in Korea and Possible Causes-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.relation.issue13-
dc.relation.volume35-
dc.relation.indexSCIE-
dc.relation.indexSCOPUS-
dc.relation.indexKCI-
dc.relation.journaltitleJOURNAL OF KOREAN MEDICAL SCIENCE-
dc.identifier.doi10.3346/jkms.2020.35.e94-
dc.identifier.wosidWOS:000523661000005-
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-85082905149-
dc.author.googlePark, Jin-
dc.author.googleKim, Claire Junga-
dc.contributor.scopusid김정아(57003903700)-
dc.contributor.scopusid박진(57209628952)-
dc.date.modifydate20211230081002-
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의과대학 > 의학과 > Journal papers
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