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Association between anxiety and aggression in adolescents: a cross-sectional study

Title
Association between anxiety and aggression in adolescents: a cross-sectional study
Authors
Chung, Jee EunSong, GonjinKim, KitaiYee, JeongKim, Joo HeeLee, Kyung EunGwak, Hye Sun
Ewha Authors
곽혜선김주희송곤진
SCOPUS Author ID
곽혜선scopus; 김주희scopus; 송곤진scopus
Issue Date
2019
Journal Title
BMC PEDIATRICS
ISSN
1471-2431JCR Link
Citation
BMC PEDIATRICS vol. 19
Keywords
AnxietyAggressionAdolescentRevised Children's manifest anxiety scaleThe aggression questionnaire
Publisher
BMC
Indexed
SCIE; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Document Type
Article
Abstract
BackgroundThe purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between anxiety proneness and aggressive behavior in adolescents.MethodsA quantitative, large scale cross-sectional study was conducted in Korea. The survey questionnaire included general health behavior and scales for assessing anxiety (Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale; RCMAS) and aggressive behavior (The Aggression Questionnaire; AQ) in adolescents.ResultsA total of 2432 students participated in the survey, and 1933 individuals completed the questionnaire, indicating a response rate of 79.5%. Based on RCMAS, 163 (8.4%) subjects were classified as the anxiety group. Aggressive behavior was significantly associated with higher anxiety scores. In particular, among four subdomains of aggression, anger and hostility had a stronger relationship with anxiety than did physical and verbal aggression. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that anxiety was independently associated with gender, age, headache, constipation, asthma, and aggression score. Adolescents with total aggression scores of 69 or higher showed a 9-fold (AOR=9.00, CI=6.33-13.51) higher risk of anxiety compared to those with under 69.ConclusionAggression and anxiety are important aspects of mental health in adolescents. Our results demonstrated that higher risk of anxiety was associated with total aggression scores. In particular, indirect aggression (i.e. anger and hostility) was more closely associated with anxiety than direct aggression.
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DOI
10.1186/s12887-019-1479-6
Appears in Collections:
약학대학 > 약학과 > Journal papers
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