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Association between Total Sugar Intake and Metabolic Syndrome in Middle-Aged Korean Men and Women

Title
Association between Total Sugar Intake and Metabolic Syndrome in Middle-Aged Korean Men and Women
Authors
Seo, Eun HaKim, HyesookKwon, Oran
Ewha Authors
권오란김혜숙
SCOPUS Author ID
권오란scopus; 김혜숙scopus
Issue Date
2019
Journal Title
NUTRIENTS
ISSN
2072-6643JCR Link
Citation
NUTRIENTS vol. 11, no. 9
Keywords
total sugarchronic diseaseKorean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES)
Publisher
MDPI
Indexed
SCIE; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Document Type
Article
Abstract
There is increasing evidence emerging that suggests high sugar intake may adversely increase the incidence of chronic diseases. However, there are only a few related studies in Korea. Based on the current Dietary Reference Intakes for Koreans, this study examined whether total sugar intake above 20% of the total energy was a risk factor for metabolic syndrome in middle-aged Korean adults. This cross-sectional study involved 7005 adults (3751 men and 3254 women) aged 40-69 years, who participated in the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES), a large community-based cohort study. Daily total sugar intake was estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire. About 9% and 16% of the men and women, respectively, derived >20% of energy intake from total sugar. The males in this category had a significantly higher odds of obesity defined as having a BMI >= 25 (OR = 1.491, 95% CI = 1.162-1.914), low HDL-cholesterol (OR = 1.313, 95% CI = 1.038-1.660), and metabolic syndrome (OR = 1.332, 95% CI = 1.038-1.709) than those who received a lower proportion of energy intake from total sugar. These results suggest that high (>20%) energy intake from total sugar may be associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in middle-aged Korean men.
DOI
10.3390/nu11092042
Appears in Collections:
신산업융합대학 > 식품영양학과 > Journal papers
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