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The Effect of Aspirin on Preventing Vascular Access Dysfunction in Incident Hemodialysis Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study in Korean Clinical Research Centers for End-Stage Renal Disease (CRC for ESRD)

Title
The Effect of Aspirin on Preventing Vascular Access Dysfunction in Incident Hemodialysis Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study in Korean Clinical Research Centers for End-Stage Renal Disease (CRC for ESRD)
Authors
Kim, Chan HoOh, Hyung JungKim, Yon SuKim, Yong-LimChang, Jae HyunRyu, Dong-Ryeol
Ewha Authors
류동열오형중
SCOPUS Author ID
류동열scopus; 오형중scopus
Issue Date
2019
Journal Title
JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE
ISSN
2077-0383JCR Link
Citation
JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE vol. 8, no. 5
Keywords
aspirinvascular access failureincident hemodialysis
Publisher
MDPI
Indexed
SCIE; SCOPUS WOS
Document Type
Article
Abstract
Background: Aspirin is often prescribed empirically to improve the patency of hemodialysis (HD) vascular access. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the impact of aspirin on the survival of vascular access in incident HD patients with arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or arteriovenous graft (AVG). Methods: A prospective cohort of 881 incident HD patients was enrolled between 2009 and 2014. The primary outcome was defined as the first AVF/AVG intervention or salvage procedure, including percutaneous transluminal angioplasty or surgery for vascular access failure. Cox analyses were performed to determine the association between aspirin usage and the occurrence of the primary outcome. Results: The mean age of the patient group was 57.9 +/- 13.4, and 63.8% of the patients were male. Aspirin was prescribed in 241 (27.4%) patients, and the median follow-up duration was 30 months. During follow-up, 180 (20.4%) patients experienced the primary outcome event. Univariate analysis showed that age, gender, presence of diabetes mellitus (DM), preexisting peripheral arterial disease, and the type of vascular access used (AVG versus AVF) were significantly associated with the development of the primary outcome. However, aspirin usage from the baseline was not significantly associated with primary outcome events (hazard ratio (HR): 1.16; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.84-1.60; p = 0.378). Multivariate analysis showed that gender, the presence of DM, and the type of vascular access were still significantly associated with the occurrence of the primary outcome. Moreover, we did not observe the protective effect of taking aspirin on primary vascular access failure, even in subgroup analyses stratified according to gender, the presence of DM, and the type of vascular access. Conclusion: Physicians should carefully consider when they prescribe aspirin for the prevention of primary vascular access failure in Korean incident HD patients. In addition, larger prospective interventional studies are needed to elucidate the effect of aspirin on vascular access failure.
DOI
10.3390/jcm8050677
Appears in Collections:
의과대학 > 의학과 > Journal papers
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