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Impact of inflammatory bowel disease on daily life: An online survey by the Korean association for the study of intestinal diseases

Title
Impact of inflammatory bowel disease on daily life: An online survey by the Korean association for the study of intestinal diseases
Authors
Kim Y.S.Jung S.-A.Lee K.-M.Park S.J.Kim T.O.Choi C.H.Kim H.G.Moon W.Moon C.M.Song H.K.Na S.-Y.Yang S.-K.
Ewha Authors
정성애문창모
SCOPUS Author ID
정성애scopus; 문창모scopus
Issue Date
2017
Journal Title
Intestinal Research
ISSN
1598-9100JCR Link
Citation
Intestinal Research vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 338 - 344
Keywords
Crohn diseaseInflammatory bowel diseaseQuality of lifeSurveys and questionnairesUlcerativeColitis
Publisher
Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases
Indexed
SCOPUS; KCI scopus
Document Type
Article
Abstract
Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disabling gastrointestinal disorder that diminishes the quality of life of the affected individuals. Limited data are available regarding the impact of IBD on the daily life of Koreans. Methods: Self-administered, computer-aided, internet-based questionnaires were distributed to members of a Korean patient organization for IBD from March to April 2013, by the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases. Results: A total of 599 patients with IBD (387 with Crohn's disease [CD] and 212 with ulcerative colitis [UC]) were enrolled. The majority of patients (81%) expressed feelings of fatigue, weakness, and being worn out in their daily lives during times of flare; this percentage was reduced to 61% during remission. Respondents were absent from work or school for an average period of 18 days because of illness, within the first 6 months; the majority of respondents (64%) felt stressed about their absence. Forty-six percent of the respondents reported having received unfair comments at work, or having suffered discrimination. Forty-seven percent of the respondents felt that IBD had negatively affected their income and earnings. Compared with patients with UC, those with CD reported a more frequent negative impact of IBD on work, or more economic burden. More than half of the respondents (61%) reported that IBD had prevented them from making or keeping friends. Conclusions: IBD significantly impacts daily life, including work, education, and social relationships. Treatment that addresses the full spectrum of life of a patient would be more effective. © 2017. Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases. All rights reserved.
DOI
10.5217/ir.2017.15.3.338
Appears in Collections:
의과대학 > 의학과 > Journal papers
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