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Suicide literacy predicts the provision of more appropriate support to people experiencing psychological distress

Title
Suicide literacy predicts the provision of more appropriate support to people experiencing psychological distress
Authors
Cruwys T.An S.Chang M.X.-L.Lee H.
Ewha Authors
안순태
SCOPUS Author ID
안순태scopus
Issue Date
2018
Journal Title
Psychiatry Research
ISSN
0165-1781JCR Link
Citation
Psychiatry Research vol. 264, pp. 96 - 103
Keywords
DepressionHelp seekingMental health literacyMental health stigmaSocial support
Publisher
Elsevier Ireland Ltd
Indexed
SCI; SCIE; SSCI; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Document Type
Article
Abstract
Mental health literacy has been hailed as a public health priority to reduce stigma and increase help seeking. We examined the effect of suicide literacy on the type of help provided to those experiencing suicidal ideation. A community sample of 363 Australians were randomly assigned to read one of three messages from a member of their social network (the target). The target reported symptoms consistent with either (1) subclinical distress, (2) clinical depression, or (3) suicidal ideation. Participants were most likely to recommend social support and least likely to recommend professional help. Suicide literacy interacted with the target's presentation, such that participants with higher suicide literacy who considered a suicidal target were less likely to recommend self-help or no action, and more likely to recommend professional help. Suicide literacy was also associated with lower suicide stigma, and unexpectedly, this indirectly predicted more reluctance to recommend professional help. Overall, results indicated that the relationship between mental health literacy, stigma, and provision of help is not straightforward. While suicide literacy was associated with greater sensitivity to a person's risk of suicide, it also predicted fewer recommendations for professional help overall, partly due to the stigma associated with seeking professional help. © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
DOI
10.1016/j.psychres.2018.03.039
Appears in Collections:
사회과학대학 > 커뮤니케이션·미디어학전공 > Journal papers
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