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Priorities of a “good death” according to cancer patients, their family caregivers, physicians, and the general population: a nationwide survey

Title
Priorities of a “good death” according to cancer patients, their family caregivers, physicians, and the general population: a nationwide survey
Authors
Kim Y.A.Kang B.D.Shim H.-J.Song E.-K.Kang J.H.Kwon J.H.Lee J.L.Lee S.N.Maeng C.H.Kang E.J.Do Y.R.Choi Y.S.Jung K.H.Yun Y.H.Kim K.-N.Sim J.-A.Kang E.K.Lee J.Choo J.Yoo S.H.Kim M.
Ewha Authors
이순남
SCOPUS Author ID
이순남scopus
Issue Date
2018
Journal Title
Supportive Care in Cancer
ISSN
0941-4355JCR Link
Citation
vol. 26, no. 10, pp. 3479 - 3488
Keywords
Attitudes toward deathCancerEnd-of-lifeGood death
Publisher
Springer Verlag
Indexed
SCI; SCIE; SCOPUS scopus
Abstract
Purpose: Understanding the concept of a “good death” is crucial to end-of-life care, but our current understanding of what constitutes a good death is insufficient. Here, we investigated the components of a good death that are important to the general population, cancer patients, their families, and physicians. Methods: We conducted a stratified nationwide cross-sectional survey of cancer patients and their families from 12 hospitals, physicians from 12 hospitals and the Korean Medical Association, and the general population, investigating their attitudes toward 10 good-death components. Findings: Three components—“not be a burden to the family,” “presence of family,” and “resolve unfinished business”—were considered the most important components by more than 2/3 of each of the three groups, and an additional three components—“freedom from pain,” “feel that life was meaningful,” and “at peace with God”—were considered important by all but the physicians group. Physicians considered “feel life was meaningful,” “presence of family,” and “not be a burden to family” as the core components of a good death, with “freedom from pain” as an additional component. “Treatment choices’ followed, “finances in order,” “mentally aware,” and “die at home” were found to be the least important components among all four groups. Conclusion: While families strongly agreed that “presence of family” and “not be a burden to family” were important to a good death, the importance of other factors differed between the groups. Health care providers should attempt to discern each patient’s view of a good death. © 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.
DOI
10.1007/s00520-018-4209-y
Appears in Collections:
의과대학 > 의학과 > Journal papers
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