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Productivity changes in OECD healthcare systems: bias-corrected Malmquist productivity approach

Title
Productivity changes in OECD healthcare systems: bias-corrected Malmquist productivity approach
Authors
Kim, YounheeOh, Dong-hyunKang, Minah
Ewha Authors
강민아
SCOPUS Author ID
강민아scopus
Issue Date
2016
Journal Title
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEALTH PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT
ISSN
0749-6753JCR Link1099-1751JCR Link
Citation
vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 537 - 553
Keywords
bootstrapefficiencyhealthcareMalmquistproductivity
Publisher
WILEY-BLACKWELL
Indexed
SSCI; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Abstract
This study evaluates productivity changes in the healthcare systems of 30 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries over the 2002-2012 periods. The bootstrapped Malmquist approach is used to estimate bias-corrected indices of healthcare performance in productivity, efficiency and technology by modifying the original distance functions. Two inputs (health expenditure and school life expectancy) and two outputs (life expectancy at birth and infant mortality rate) are used to calculate productivity growth. There are no perceptible trends in productivity changes over the 2002-2012 periods, but positive productivity improvement has been noticed for most OECD countries. The result also informs considerable variations in annual productivity scores across the countries. Average annual productivity growth is evenly yielded by efficiency and technical changes, but both changes run somewhat differently across the years. The results of this study assert that policy reforms in OECD countries have improved productivity growth in healthcare systems over the past decade. Countries that lag behind in productivity growth should benchmark peer countries' practices to increase performance by prioritizing an achievable trajectory based on socioeconomic conditions. For example, relatively inefficient countries in this study indicate higher income inequality, corresponding to inequality and health outcomes studies. Although income inequality and globalization are not direct measures to estimate healthcare productivity in this study, these issues could be latent factors to explain cross-country healthcare productivity for future research. Copyright (c) 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
DOI
10.1002/hpm.2333
Appears in Collections:
사회과학대학 > 행정학전공 > Journal papers
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