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Relationship between weekend catch-up sleep and poor performance on attention tasks in Korean adolescents

Title
Relationship between weekend catch-up sleep and poor performance on attention tasks in Korean adolescents
Authors
Kim S.J.Lee Y.J.Cho S.-J.Cho I.-H.Lim W.
Ewha Authors
임원정
SCOPUS Author ID
임원정scopus
Issue Date
2011
Journal Title
Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
ISSN
1072-4710JCR Link
Citation
vol. 165, no. 9, pp. 806 - 812
Indexed
SCOPUS WOS scopus
Abstract
Objective: To investigate the relationship between insufficient sleep and poor attention in Korean adolescents, adjusting for potential confounding factors of depressed mood and habitual snoring. Design: School-based cross-sectional study. Setting: Eight high schools in 3 cities in the Republic of Korea. Participants: A sample of 2638 urban high school students (42.2% male and 57.8% female; mean [SD] age, 17.3 [0.6] years [age range, 14-19 years]) completed questionnaires and computerized attention tasks during the school term. Exposure: Weekend catch-up sleep. Main Outcome Measures: Self-reported sleep schedules and habits, including sleep duration, bedtime, wake-up time, depressed mood, and habitual snoring. Also measured were numbers of omission and commission errors on computerized attention tasks. Results: The mean (SD) sleep duration on weekdays was 5 hours 42 minutes (1 hour 0 minutes) per day and on weekends was 8 hours 24 minutes (1 hour 36 minutes) per day. The mean (SD) weekend catch-up sleep was 2 hours 42 minutes (1 hour 42 minutes) per day. After adjusting for age, sex, depressed mood (Beck Depression Inventory score, ≥10), habitual snoring, and weekday sleep duration, increased weekend catch-up sleep was significantly associated with more omission and commission errors on sustained attention tasks (P<.001 and P=.03, respectively) and on divided attention tasks (P=.01 and P=.04, respectively). Conclusions: Increased weekend catch-up sleep as an indicator of insufficient weekday sleep is associated with poor performance on objective attention tasks. Assessment of catch-up sleep and sleep duration may be useful for physicians to evaluate sleep insufficiency and its adverse effects on attention in adolescents. ©2011 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.
DOI
10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.128
Appears in Collections:
의학전문대학원 > 의학과 > Journal papers
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