View : 19 Download: 0

Dietary calcium and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 regulate transcription of calcium transporter genes in calbindin-D9k knockout mice

Title
Dietary calcium and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 regulate transcription of calcium transporter genes in calbindin-D9k knockout mice
Authors
Ko S.-H.Lee G.-S.Vo T.T.B.Jung E.-M.Choi K.-C.Cheung K.-W.Kim J.W.Park J.-G.Oh G.T.Jeung E.-B.
Ewha Authors
오구택
SCOPUS Author ID
오구택scopus
Issue Date
2009
Journal Title
Journal of Reproduction and Development
ISSN
0916-8818JCR Link
Citation
vol. 55, no. 2, pp. 137 - 142
Indexed
SCIE; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Abstract
The effect(s) of oral calcium and vitamin D3 were examined on the expression of duodenal and renal active calcium transport genes, i.e., calbindin-D9k (CaBP-9k) and calbindin-D28k (CaBP-28k), transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPV5 and TRPV6), Na+/Ca2+ exchanger 1 (NCX1) and plasma membrane calcium ATPase 1b (PMCA1b), in CaBP-9k KO mice. Wild-type (WT) and KO mice were provided with calcium and vitamin D3-deficient diets for 10 weeks. The deficient diet significantly decreased body weights compared with the normal diet groups. The serum calcium concentration of the WT mice was decreased by the deficient diet but was unchanged in the KO mice. The deficient diet significantly increased duodenal transcription of CaBP-9k and TRPV6 in the WT mice, but no alteration was observed in the KO mice. In the kidney, the deficient diet significantly increased renal transcripts of CaBP-9k, TRPV6, PMCA1b, CaBP-28k and TRPV5 in the WT mice but did not alter calcium-relating genes in the KO mice. Two potential mediators of calcium-processing genes, vitamin D receptor (VDR) and parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR), have been suggested to be useful for elucidating these differential regulations in the calcium-related genes of the KO mice. Expression of VDR was not significantly affected by diet or the KO mutation. Renal PTHR mRNA levels were reduced by the diet, and reduced expression was also seen in the KO mice given the normal diet. Taken together, these results suggest that the active calcium transporting genes in KO mice may have resistance to the deficiency diet of calcium and vitamin D3.
DOI
10.1262/jrd.20139
Appears in Collections:
자연과학대학 > 생명과학전공 > Journal papers
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Export
RIS (EndNote)
XLS (Excel)
XML


qrcode

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

BROWSE