View : 147 Download: 0

When Do Laws Matter? National Minimum-Age-of-Marriage Laws, Child Rights, and Adolescent Fertility, 1989-2007

Title
When Do Laws Matter? National Minimum-Age-of-Marriage Laws, Child Rights, and Adolescent Fertility, 1989-2007
Authors
Kim M.Longhofer W.Boyle E.H.Nyseth Brehm H.
Ewha Authors
김민지
SCOPUS Author ID
김민지scopus
Issue Date
2013
Journal Title
Law and Society Review
ISSN
0023-9216JCR Link
Citation
vol. 47, no. 3, pp. 589 - 619
Indexed
SSCI; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Abstract
Using the case of adolescent fertility, we ask the questions of whether and when national laws have an effect on outcomes above and beyond the effects of international law and global organizing. To answer these questions, we utilize a fixed-effect time-series regression model to analyze the impact of minimum-age-of-marriage laws in 115 poor- and middle-income countries from 1989 to 2007. We find that countries with strict laws setting the minimum age of marriage at 18 experienced the most dramatic decline in rates of adolescent fertility. Trends in countries that set this age at 18 but allowed exceptions (for example, marriage with parental consent) were indistinguishable from countries that had no such minimum-age-of-marriage law. Thus, policies that adhere strictly to global norms are more likely to elicit desired outcomes. The article concludes with a discussion of what national law means in a diffuse global system where multiple actors and institutions make the independent effect of law difficult to identify. © 2013 Law and Society Association.
DOI
10.1111/lasr.12033
Appears in Collections:
사회과학대학 > 사회학전공 > Journal papers
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Export
RIS (EndNote)
XLS (Excel)
XML


qrcode

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

BROWSE