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Protein glutathionylation in the regulation of peroxiredoxins: A family of thiol-specific peroxidases that function as antioxidants, molecular chaperones, and signal modulators

Title
Protein glutathionylation in the regulation of peroxiredoxins: A family of thiol-specific peroxidases that function as antioxidants, molecular chaperones, and signal modulators
Authors
Chae H.Z.Oubrahim H.Park J.W.Rhee S.G.Chock P.B.
Ewha Authors
이서구
SCOPUS Author ID
이서구scopusscopus
Issue Date
2012
Journal Title
Antioxidants and Redox Signaling
ISSN
1523-0864JCR Link
Citation
vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 506 - 523
Indexed
SCI; SCIE; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Abstract
Reversible protein glutathionylation plays an important role in cellular regulation, signaling transduction, and antioxidant defense. This redox-sensitive mechanism is involved in regulating the functions of peroxiredoxins (Prxs), a family of ubiquitously expressed thiol-specific peroxidase enzymes. Glutathionylation of certain Prxs at their active-site cysteines not only provides reducing equivalents to support their peroxidase activity but also protects Prxs from irreversible hyperoxidation. Typical 2-Cys Prx also functions as a molecular chaperone when it exists as a decamer and/or higher molecular weight complexes. The hyperoxidized sulfinic derivative of 2-Cys Prx is reactivated by sulfiredoxin (Srx). In this review, the roles of glutathionylation in the regulation of Prxs are discussed with respect to their molecular structure and functions as antioxidants, molecular chaperones, and signal modulators. Recent Advances: Recent findings reveal that glutathionylation regulates the quaternary structure of Prx. Glutathionylation of Prx I at Cys 83 converts the decameric Prx to its dimers with the loss of chaperone activity. The findings that dimer/oligomer structure specific Prx I binding proteins, e.g., phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and mammalian Ste20-like kinase-1 (MST1), regulate cell cycle and apoptosis, respectively, suggest a possible link between glutathionylation and those signaling pathways. Critical Issues: Knowing how glutathionylation affects the interaction between Prx I and its nearly 20 known interacting proteins, e.g., PTEN and MST1 kinase, would reveal new insights on the physiological functions of Prx. Future Directions: In vitro studies reveal that Prx oligomerization is linked to its functional changes. However, in vivo dynamics, including the effect by glutathionylation, and its physiological significance remain to be investigated. © 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
DOI
10.1089/ars.2011.4260
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일반대학원 > 생명·약학부 > Journal papers
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