View : 23 Download: 0

Identification of airborne bacterial and fungal community structures in an urban area by T-RFLP analysis and quantitative real-time PCR

Title
Identification of airborne bacterial and fungal community structures in an urban area by T-RFLP analysis and quantitative real-time PCR
Authors
Lee S.-H.Lee H.-J.Kim S.-J.Lee H.M.Kang H.Kim Y.P.
Ewha Authors
김용표
SCOPUS Author ID
김용표scopus
Issue Date
2010
Journal Title
Science of the Total Environment
ISSN
0048-9697JCR Link
Citation
vol. 408, no. 6, pp. 1349 - 1357
Indexed
SCI; SCIE; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Abstract
This study explores the characteristics of bacterial and fungal communities of total suspended particles (TSP) in the atmosphere by using various molecular methods. TSP samples were collected on a glass fiber filter at an urban location in the middle of the Korean Peninsula (Seoul) between middle autumn and early winter in 2007. From the aerosol samples, DNA could be extracted and DNA sequences were determined for bacteria and fungi. Terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis was applied to analyze the community structure of them. To estimate the concentration of DNA originating from bacterial and fungal communities, we used the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Sequence analyses were also used to determine the identity of biological organisms. The number of bacteria and fungi in the air were between 5.19 × 101 and 4.31 × 103 cells m- 3 and from 9.56 × 101 to 4.22 × 104 cells m- 3, respectively and bacterium/fungus ratios ranged from 0.09 to 0.76 across the seven sampling dates. Most of the bacterial sequences found in our TSP samples were from Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. The fungal sequences were characteristic for Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Glomeromycota which are known to actively discharge spores into the atmosphere. The plant sequences could be also detected. We found that large shifts in the community structure of bacteria and fungi were present in our TSP samples collected on different dates. The results demonstrated that in our TSP samples collected at the urban site; (1) there were very diverse bacterial and fungal groups including potential pathogens and allergens and (2) there were temporal shifts in both bacterial and fungal communities in terms of both diversity and abundances across an inter-seasonal period. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2009.10.061
Appears in Collections:
엘텍공과대학 > 화학신소재공학전공 > Journal papers
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Export
RIS (EndNote)
XLS (Excel)
XML


qrcode

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

BROWSE