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In vitro generation of functional dendritic cells from human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells by a 2-step culture method

Title
In vitro generation of functional dendritic cells from human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells by a 2-step culture method
Authors
Kyung H.R.Su J.C.Yoon J.J.Ju Y.S.Jeong H.K.Sang H.K.Hyoung J.K.Hyo S.A.Hee Y.S.
Ewha Authors
서주영유경하조수진
SCOPUS Author ID
서주영scopus; 유경하scopus; 조수진scopus
Issue Date
2004
Journal Title
International Journal of Hematology
ISSN
0925-5710JCR Link
Citation
vol. 80, no. 3, pp. 281 - 286
Indexed
SCIE; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Abstract
Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells in terms of initiating primary T-cell-dependent immune responses. We devised a 2-step culture method for obtaining sufficient numbers of functional DCs from umbilical cord blood (CB) CD34+ cells. In the first step, CB CD34+ cells were expanded by stimulation with early-acting cytokines such as stem cell factor (SCF), flt3 ligand (FL), and thrombopoietin (TPO) to amplify the hematopoietic progenitor cells. In the second step, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin 4 were added, and incubation was continued for another 5 days to induce differentiation of the expanded cells into DCs. During the first step of culturing with TPO, SCF, and FL, the total numbers of nucleated cells gradually increased, peaking at 4 weeks (245.3-fold). During the second step, expression of CD1a, CD83, and CD86 increased. Electron microscopic findings showed that these cells had cytosolic expansion to form dendrites and major histocompatibility complex class II compartments, which are characteristic of DCs. Functional analyses revealed that these cells had phagocytic activity and were capable of stimulating allogeneic T-cells in vitro. © 2004 The Japanese Society of Hematology.
DOI
10.1532/IJH97.A10406
Appears in Collections:
의학전문대학원 > 의학과 > Journal papers
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