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Subregional Shape Alterations in the Amygdala in Patients with Panic Disorder

Title
Subregional Shape Alterations in the Amygdala in Patients with Panic Disorder
Authors
Yoon, SujungKim, Jieun E.Kim, Geon HaKang, Hee JinKim, Bori R.Jeon, SaeromIm, Jooyeon JamieHyun, HeejungMoon, SohyeonLim, Soo MeeLyoo, In Kyoon
Ewha Authors
임수미김지은류인균윤수정김건하
SCOPUS Author ID
임수미scopus; 김지은scopus; 류인균scopus; 윤수정scopus; 김건하scopus
Issue Date
2016
Journal Title
PLOS ONE
ISSN
1932-6203JCR Link
Citation
vol. 11, no. 6
Publisher
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
Indexed
SCIE; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Abstract
Background The amygdala has been known to play a pivotal role in mediating fear-related responses including panic attacks. Given the functionally distinct role of the amygdalar subregions, morphometric measurements of the amygdala may point to the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying panic disorder. The current study aimed to determine the global and local morphometric alterations of the amygdala related to panic disorder. Methods Volumetric and surface-based morphometric approach to high-resolution three-dimensional T1-weighted images was used to examine the structural variations of the amygdala, with respect to extent and location, in 23 patients with panic disorder and 31 matched healthy individuals. Results There were no significant differences in bilateral amygdalar volumes between patients with panic disorder and healthy individuals despite a trend-level right amygdalar volume reduction related to panic disorder (right, beta = -0.23, p = 0.09, Cohen's d = 0.51; left, beta = -0.18, p = 0.19, Cohen's d = 0.45). Amygdalar subregions were localized into three groups including the superficial, centromedial, and laterobasal groups based on the cytoarchitectonically defined probability map. Surface-based morphometric analysis revealed shape alterations in the laterobasal and centromedial groups of the right amygdala in patients with panic disorder (false discovery rate corrected p < 0.05). Conclusions The current findings suggest that subregion-specific shape alterations in the right amygdala may be involved in the development and maintenance of panic disorder, which may be attributed to the cause or effects of amygdalar hyperactivation.
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0157856
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의학전문대학원 > 의학과 > Journal papers
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