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Comparison of Prevalence- and Smoking Impact Ratio-Based Methods of Estimating Smoking-Attributable Fractions of Deaths

Title
Comparison of Prevalence- and Smoking Impact Ratio-Based Methods of Estimating Smoking-Attributable Fractions of Deaths
Authors
Kong, Kyoung AeJung-Choi, Kyung-HeeLim, DoheeLee, Hye AhLee, Won KyungBaik, Sun JungPark, Su HyunPark, Hyesook
Ewha Authors
박혜숙최경희이혜아
SCOPUS Author ID
박혜숙scopus; 이혜아scopus
Issue Date
2016
Journal Title
JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY
ISSN
0917-5040JCR Link1349-9092JCR Link
Citation
vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 145 - 154
Keywords
smokingpopulation-attributable fractionrisk assessmentpopulation health
Publisher
JAPAN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL ASSOC
Indexed
SCIE; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Abstract
Background: Smoking is a major modifiable risk factor for premature mortality. Estimating the smoking-attributable burden is important for public health policy. Typically, prevalence-or smoking impact ratio (SIR)-based methods are used to derive estimates, but there is controversy over which method is more appropriate for country-specific estimates. We compared smoking-attributable fractions (SAFs) of deaths estimated by these two methods. Methods: To estimate SAFs in 2012, we used several different prevalence-based approaches using no lag and 10-and 20-year lags. For the SIR-based method, we obtained lung cancer mortality rates from the Korean Cancer Prevention Study (KCPS) and from the United States-based Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II). The relative risks for the diseases associated with smoking were also obtained from these cohort studies. Results: For males, SAFs obtained using KCPS-derived SIRs were similar to those obtained using prevalence-based methods. For females, SAFs obtained using KCPS-derived SIRs were markedly greater than all prevalence-based SAFs. Differences in prevalence-based SAFs by time-lag period were minimal among males, but SAFs obtained using longer-lagged prevalence periods were significantly larger among females. SAFs obtained using CPSII-based SIRs were lower than KCPS-based SAFs by >15 percentage points for most diseases, with the exceptions of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Conclusions: SAFs obtained using prevalence-and SIR-based methods were similar for males. However, neither prevalence-based nor SIR-based methods resulted in precise SAFs among females. The characteristics of the study population should be carefully considered when choosing a method to estimate SAF.
DOI
10.2188/jea.JE20150058
Appears in Collections:
의학전문대학원 > 의학과 > Journal papers
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