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Aerobic and resistance training dependent skeletal muscle plasticity in the colon-26 murine model of cancer cachexia

Title
Aerobic and resistance training dependent skeletal muscle plasticity in the colon-26 murine model of cancer cachexia
Authors
Khamoui, Andy V.Park, Bong-SupKim, Do-HounYeh, Ming-ChiaOh, Seung-LyulElam, Marcus L.Jo, EdwardArjmandi, Bahrain H.Salazar, GloriaGrant, Samuel C.Contreras, Robert J.Lee, Won JunKim, Jeong-Su
Ewha Authors
이원준
SCOPUS Author ID
이원준scopus
Issue Date
2016
Journal Title
METABOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL
ISSN
0026-0495JCR Link1532-8600JCR Link
Citation
vol. 65, no. 5, pp. 685 - 698
Keywords
Muscle atrophyCachecticExercise trainingLadder climbingMyogenin
Publisher
W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC
Indexed
SCI; SCIE; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Abstract
Purpose. The appropriate mode of exercise training for cancer cachexia is not well established. Using the colon-26 (C26) mouse model of cancer cachexia, we defined and compared the skeletal muscle responses to aerobic and resistance training. Methods. Twelve-month old Balb/c mice were initially assigned to control, aerobic training (AT; wheel running), or resistance training (RT; ladder climbing) (n = 16-17/group). After 8 weeks of training, half of each group was injected with C26 tumor cells, followed by 3 additional weeks of training. Body composition and neuromuscular function was evaluated pre- and post-training. Muscles were collected post-training and analyzed for fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), Akt mTOR signaling, and expression of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and myogenic regulatory factors. Results. Total body mass decreased (p < 0.05) in C26 (-8%), AT + C26 (-18%), and RT + C26 (-15%) but not control. Sensorimotor function declined (p < 0.05) in control (-16%), C26 (-13%), and RT + C26 (-23%) but not AT + C26. Similarly, strength/body weight decreased (p < 0.05) in control (-7%), C26 (-21%), and RT + C26 (-10%) but not AT + C26. Gastrocnemius mass/body weight tended to be greater in AT + C26 vs. C26 (+6%, p = 0.09). Enlargement of the spleen was partially corrected in AT + C26 (-27% vs. C26, p < 0.05). Fiber CSA was lower in all C26 groups vs. control (-32% to 46%, p < 0.05); however, the effect size calculated from C26 and AT + C26 was large (+24%, d = 1.04). Phosphorylated levels of mTOR in AT + C26 exceeded C26 (+32%, p < 0.05). RT + C26 showed greater mRNA expression (p < 0.05) of IGF-IEa (+79%) and myogenin (+126%) with a strong tendency for greater IGF-IEb (+127%, p = 0.069) vs. control. Conclusions. Aerobic or resistance training was unable to prevent tumor-induced body weight loss. However, aerobic training may have preserved function, reduced the inflammatory response of the spleen, and marginally rescued muscle mass possibly through activation of mTOR. Aerobic training may therefore have therpeutic value for patients with cancer cachexia. In contrast, resistance training induced the expression of genes associated with muscle damage and repair. This gene response may be supportive of excessive stress generated by high resistance loading in a tumor-bearing state. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
DOI
10.1016/j.metabol.2016.01.014
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신산업융합대학 > 체육과학부 > Journal papers
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