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Predictors for Persistent Overweight, Deteriorated Weight Status, and Improved Weight Status During 18 Months in a School-Based Longitudinal Cohort

Title
Predictors for Persistent Overweight, Deteriorated Weight Status, and Improved Weight Status During 18 Months in a School-Based Longitudinal Cohort
Authors
Seo, Dong-ChulKing, Mindy H.Kim, NayoungSovinski, DanielleMeade, RhondaLederer, Alyssa M.
Ewha Authors
서동철
SCOPUS Author ID
서동철scopus
Issue Date
2015
Journal Title
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH PROMOTION
ISSN
0890-1171JCR Link2168-6602JCR Link
Citation
vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 22 - 27
Keywords
ObesityWeightSchool HealthLongitudinal CohortChildrenPrevention Research
Publisher
AMER JOURNAL HEALTH PROMOTION INC
Indexed
SSCI; SCOPUS WOS scopus
Abstract
Purpose. To examine predictors for persistent overweight/obesity, deteriorated weight status, and improved weight status among students who participated in a school-based obesity prevention intervention from fall 2009 to spring 2011. Design. Longitudinal assessment of a school-based cohort was conducted to determine the characteristics of students who remained overweight/obese, improved their weight status, or showed deteriorated weight status during an 18-month period. Setting. Eleven schools in southern Indiana, northwestern Kentucky, and southeastern Illinois. Subjects. N= 5309 students in 4th through 12th grade. Measures. Weight, height, and self-reported physical activity and nutrition behaviors of students were measured at baseline and 6, 12, and 18 months. Analysis. SAS 9.3 was employed to examine predictors for the three different weight categories using logistic regression. Results. Low socioeconomic status (SES) (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.56 and p <.001, AOR= 1.35 and p=.0069, respectively) and higher soda intake (AOR= 1.07 and p=.0016, AOR= 1.08 and p=.0278, respectively) increased the odds of belonging to persistent overweight/obesity (30.6%) and deteriorated weight status (6.9%), compared to the persistent nonoverweight status group. Conclusion. While SES is an important determinant of weight category change, students' screen time and soda consumption may be important factors. Schools and families may be able to successfully focus on these modifiable risk factors, decreasing the burden of childhood obesity. (Am J Health Promot 2015;30[1]: 22-27.)
DOI
10.4278/ajhp.131118-QUAN-585
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신산업융합대학 > 융합보건학과 > Journal papers
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