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Domestic law and international relations: USA PATRIOT act, Section 311, and the North Korean Human Rights Act of 2004

Title
Domestic law and international relations: USA PATRIOT act, Section 311, and the North Korean Human Rights Act of 2004
Authors
Pak, Bliss BurdettKim, Jasper
Ewha Authors
Jasper S. KimBliss B. Pak
SCOPUS Author ID
Jasper S. Kimscopus
Issue Date
2007
Journal Title
KOREAN JOURNAL OF DEFENSE ANALYSIS
ISSN
1016-3271JCR Link
Citation
vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 167 - 194
Publisher
KOREAN INST DEFENSE ANALYSES
Indexed
SSCI; SCOPUS; KCI WOS
Abstract
This article proposes that the future of international relations increasingly will be affected by domestic law. We examine this thesis in the context of United States-North Korean relations from 2004 to 2007. The statutory content, application and observable results of two U.S. domestic statutes are offered as a study in contrasting approaches for domestic law and policy with international relations impact: (i) Section 311 of the USA PATRIOT Act of 2001 as applied to a third-state bank (Macau's Banco Delta Asia), based on evidence of money laundering connected to North Korean criminal financial activity, and (ii) the North Korean Human Rights Act of 2004. We find that the differing statutory content, methods of application and institutional context likely account for the drastically different results on the target nation's behavior. While the impact of the North Korean Human Rights Act has been either negligible or negative in terms of inspiring behavioral change in the target, the anti-money laundering provisions of the USA PATRIOT Act appear to have affected not only the activities specifically targeted by the domestic statute, but also resolution of an enforcement action under its authority recently became a top priority agenda item in international diplomatic negotiations among the United States, North Korea and other nations within the framework of the Six-Party Talks. We conclude that the apparent success of the domestically launched U.S. anti-money laundering enforcement action to affect international relations offers a role model for domestic legal action with foreign relations outcomes. This domestic legal model is likely to be repeated in other contexts, and likely to be effective for jurisdictions with important international financial centers.
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국제대학원 > 국제학과 > Journal papers
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